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What are the benefits of a collaborative divorce?

| Oct 21, 2020 | Divorce |

Some people in New Jersey might laugh at the thought of a collaborative divorce. If they had a bad breakup with their spouse, the last thing they want to do is sit down and try to negotiate the issue civilly. They know that a lot is at stake in the divorce, from child custody to financial assets, so why should they be friendly with their former spouse?

In fact, a collaborative divorce can be beneficial in the long run. When both parties work together instead of against each other, they’re more likely to figure out a resolution that satisfies them both.

What is a collaborative divorce?

When a couple agrees to a collaborative divorce, each spouse hires their own attorney. The attorneys meet with the clients separately and then arrange for all four people to meet together. During this time, the couple discusses the issues in a calm, reasonable manner. Their attorneys will act as mediators and help keep the process civil.

If the collaborative approach doesn’t work, the divorce might become a lengthy court battle. But if the collaborative approach is successful, the divorce can be finalized without court appearances and massive legal fees. Both people can come to an agreement and move on with their lives.

Where can you get help with a collaborative divorce?

A collaborative divorce might sound appealing, but you can’t do it alone. That’s why you need a family law attorney to help you through the process.

An attorney may be able to act as a mediator and keep things civil during your meetings with your former spouse. Your attorney might also offer advice to help you and your spouse reach an agreement. If you’ve already tried the collaborative approach and it didn’t work, you might wish to hire an attorney to represent you in court.